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Virginia Woolf

 

  • Virginia Woolf’s Life
  • First years and childhood
  • Virginia Woolf, who lived in London in 1882, was the daughter of Sir Leslie Stephen, a well-known writer of the Victorian era. Mom and dad had previously married others, and after they had been widowed, they came together. Both of them had children from their first wife. Sir Leslie Stephen’s first wife was the daughter of the famous novelist William Makepeace Thackeray. Vanessa, Julian, Thoby, Virginia and Adrian, respectively. Her mother died suddenly when Virginia was thirteen. Woolf was not able to be sent to the school because of the fact that women had to remain on the second platoon in those years, but she developed himself with the help of her father.

 

  • Bloomsbury Group
  • The transfer of her brothers to Bloomsbury in 1904 after her father’s death was a serious turning point in her life. The Bloomsbury group consisted of a group of intellectuals, many of whom were famous writers and known for their libertarian attitudes in sexual matters. Many people in the group were gay or bisexual. People saw them as an ethical group. In the group were John Maynard Keynes, E. M. Forster, Roger Fry, Duncan Grant and Lytton Strachey. Woolf was engaged to Lytton Strachey for a while in 1909.

 

  • Virginia Woolf’s Marriage
  • Virginia Woolf married Leonard Woolf in 1912. Leonard Woolf had set up a printing house for her wife, which was an opportunity to publish books written by Virginia Woolf.

 

  • Death of Virginia Woolf
  • she did not feel himself capable enough anymore in the time she wrote her novel Inter-Curiosity, thinking she lost her talent. Every day there was stress, horror and frustration in the fear of war and loss of ability, and she could not stand the situation on March 28, 1941. she filled her pockets with stones in Ouse river near her houses and committed suicide. Virginia Woolf left two suicide letters behind. One is her sister, Vanessa Bell, and the other is her husband, Leonard Woolf.

 

  • Leonard Woolf, 18 March 1941
  • “Darling, I feel like I’m going crazy again I feel like I can not live that terrible life again And I will not heal it this time I’ve started to hear voices I can not focus I’m doing what I see as the best thing to do So you gave me the greatest happiness Before I could find this terrible sickness, I could not think of two people who could be as happy as we could be together.I do not have the power to fight anymore.I am aware that I ruined your life and I know that if you do not I will be able to work comfortably.You will see this too.You see, I want you to have all the happiness I’ve ever had You’ve always been patient and very good to me I mean, everyone knows that if someone could save me, you’d be the one for me Now everything is over for me I can only do you a favor. I can not think of any more people that could be as happy as we do. “

 

  • Virginia Woolf’s Writing
  • The Voyage Out, the first book of Virginia Woolf that began writing in 1905 as a professional, was published in 1915. The writing of this book took a very long time and was rewritten three times in a year. This book is particularly interesting, as it relates to the annihilation of her mother’s death.

 

  • Night and Day is Virginia Woolf’s second novel. Unlike her later modern experimental novels using Woolf’s “flow of consciousness” technique, this piece of classic realist styling captures attention with her character that reflects the atmosphere of the period, her character of the actual space, her portrayals of real space and her meticulously depicted characters.

 

  • The novel, which was published in 1920, portrays the object reality and the reflection of history in human consciousness in very different characters, skillfully as a reporter of later works.

 

  • The novel goes on in London before World War I. Woolf tells the age of intelligence, the world of ideas and soul humorously but warmly, a humanitarian dill. She discusses issues such as women’s rights, class differences, love, marriage and freedom in terms of their characters’ lives, struggles, hopes and pain. Night and Day, Katharine, Mary and Ralph’s fate of the modern man we have witnessed in their quest for truth is a soulful and profound text on the struggle to understand another.

 

  • Virginia Woolf, while writing the Waves she published in 1931, knew that by this book no other novelist would want to do different things until that day, and that this novel would not resemble any other novel written that day. (…) Both prose will be taken and poetry will be, both novels and theatrical play.

 

  • Virginia Woolf’s Works and Books
  • A Room of One’s Own
  • Mrs. Dalloway
  • To the Lighthouse
  • Orlando
  • The Waves
  • The Voyage Out
  • Night and Day
  • Jacob’s Room
  • Between the Acts
  • A Writer’s Diary

 

 

  • Quotes about women
  •  “I would venture to guess that Anon, who wrote so many poems without signing them, was often a woman.” 
  • Virginia Woolf

 

  • Quotes about freedom, women and writing
  • “Lock up your libraries if you like; but there is no gate, no lock, no bolt that you can set upon the freedom of my mind.” 
  • Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own

 

  • Quotes about life and peace
  • “You cannot find peace by avoiding life.” 
  • Virginia Woolf

 

  • Quotes about books, metaphor and soul
  • “Books are the mirrors of the soul.” 
  • Virginia Woolf, Between the Acts

 

  • Quotes about men, rescuing and women
  • “Why are women… so much more interesting to men than men are to women?” 
  • Virginia Woolf

 

  • Quotes about food and love
  • “One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.” 
  • Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own

 

  • Quotes about honesty, lies, stories and truth
  • “If you do not tell the truth about yourself you cannot tell it about other people.” 
  • Virginia Woolf

 

  • Quotes about writing
  • “Writing is like sex. First you do it for love, then you do it for your friends, and then you do it for money.”
  • Virginia Woolf 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Quotes about women
  • “As a woman I have no country. As a woman I want no country. As a woman, my country is the whole world.” 
  • Virginia Woolf

 

  • Quotes about beauty, emotion, history, memory and recollection
  • “I can only note that the past is beautiful because one never realises an emotion at the time. It expands later, and thus we don’t have complete emotions about the present, only about the past.” 
  • Virginia Woolf

 

  • Quotes about life
  • “When you consider things like the stars, our affairs don’t seem to matter very much, do they?” 
  • Virginia Woolf

 

  • Quotes about confidence
  • “The eyes of others our prisons; their thoughts our cages.” 
  • Virginia Woolf

 

  • Quotes about clichés, dignity, double standards, empowerment, feminism, gender, hypocrisy, intelligence, men, misogyny, self determination, social norms, stereotypes, thought and women
  • “As long as she thinks of a man, nobody objects to a woman thinking.” 
  • Virginia Woolf, Orlando

 

  • Quotes about growing up, illusions and life
  • “Growing up is losing some illusions, in order to acquire others.” 
  • Virginia Woolf

 

  • Quotes about calming, reassuring and true
  • “No need to hurry. No need to sparkle. No need to be anybody but oneself.” 
  • Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own / Three Guineas

 

  • Quotes about anonymous, poetry and woman
  • “Anon, who wrote so many poems without signing them, was often a woman.”
  • Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own

 

  • Quotes about sadness
  • “Nothing thicker than a knife’s blade separates happiness from melancholy.”
  • Virginia Woolf, Orlando

 

  • Quotes about clouds and star
  • “There was a star riding through clouds one night, & I said to the star, ‘Consume me’.”
  • Virginia Woolf, The Waves

 

  • Quotes about love, poetry and women
  • “Love, the poet said, is woman’s whole existence.”
  • Virginia Woolf, Orlando

 

  • Quotes about solitude
  • “Orlando naturally loved solitary places, vast views, and to feel himself for ever and ever and ever alone.”
  • Virginia Woolf, Orlando

 

  • Quotes about books and library
  • “Second hand books are wild books, homeless books; they have come together in vast flocks of variegated feather, and have a charm which the domesticated volumes of the library lack.”
  • Virginia Woolf

 

  • Quotes about criticism, dignity, double standards, empowerment, equality, feminism, gender, hypocrisy, judgment, men, misogyny, poetry, respect, women and writing
  • “A woman knows very well that, though a wit sends her his poems, praises her judgment, solicits her criticism, and drinks her tea, this by no means signifies that he respects her opinions, admires her understanding, or will refuse, though the rapier is denied him, to run through the body with his pen.”
  • Virginia Woolf, Orlando

 

  • Quotes about arrogance, empowerment, feminism, gender, hypocrisy, inequality, men, self importance and women
  • “Women have served all these centuries as looking glasses possessing the magic and delicious power of reflecting the figure of man at twice its natural size.”
  • Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own

 

  • Quotes about rena silverman, virginia woolf
  • “I thought how unpleasant it is to be locked out; and I thought how it is worse, perhaps, to be locked in.”
  • Virginia Woolf

 

  • Quotes about book lovers, bookworms, heavenly rewards, judgment and reading
  • “When the Day of Judgment dawns and people, great and small, come marching in to receive their heavenly rewards, the Almighty will gaze upon the mere bookworms and say to Peter, “Look, these need no reward. We have nothing to give them. They have loved reading.”
  • Virginia Woolf

 

  • Quotes about fiction, money, on writing, virgin, women and writing
  • “A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction.”
  • Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own

 

  • Quotes about obsession
  • “All extremes of feeling are allied with madness.”
  • Virginia Woolf, Orlando

 

  • Quotes about women
  • “The truth is, I often like women. I like their unconventionality. I like their completeness. I like their anonymity. ”
  • Virginia Woolf

 

 

Virginia Woolf
Author: wik Date: 12:05 am
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